Depression-What to do for someone you love or yourself  
HOW DO YOU KNOW IF YOU OR SOMEONE YOU LOVE IS DEPRESSED?
It is perfectly normal to have feelings of grief and loss when life changing events happen like a job loss, a divorce,
death of a loved one, your pet dies, you find out your spouse is cheating, a significant relationship ends, or your
children no longer live with you.  Any of these events can trigger a depressive episode.  
Depression is highly treatable and an estimated 17 million people have it each year according to the National Institute
of Mental Health.  If feelings of sadness or feeling “down” last for more than two weeks and if they interfere with daily
activities you may be depressed.  Depressed individuals tend to blame themselves, feel helpless and hopeless, have
no energy, are overwhelmed, may stop participating in their routine activities, may withdraw from friends and family,
may have disrupted sleep, may have crying spells, can be irritable or moody, and may have thoughts of suicide or
death.

WHAT SHOULD I DO?
Call Dr. Sandra Rahe, a licensed independent mental health practitioner (LIMHP) and a certified school psychologist
because it is extremely important to get professional counseling.  Unexpressed feelings and concerns accompanied by
a sense of isolation can worsen depression.   Counseling offers the chance to identify factors contributing to
depression and to learn effective skills to make psychological, interpersonal, situational, and behavioral changes to
decrease the depressive symptoms.  Family or marital therapy may be beneficial to help everyone effected by the
depression learn effective ways to cope together.  It is hard to watch someone you love suffer from depression.

DO I HAVE TO TAKE MEDICATION?
First, Sandra Rahe, Ph.D., or your physician needs to conduct a thorough assessment and make recommendations
for an effective course of treatment.  Some depressed people prefer counseling instead of taking medication if their
depression is not severe.  Counseling alone or the use of medication alone can produce successful results.  
According to a study conducted at Stanford University School of Medicine and presented to the American
Psychological Association on May 19, 2009, “the added value of the combination treatment (psychotherapy and
medication) produced dramatic results-faster and more successful improvement than counseling alone or medication
alone” said Charles DeBattista, MD., the director of the Depression Research Clinic.
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         Call 402-299-3018 for an appointment today!
                            Sandra Rahe, Ph.D., LIMHP

              16707 Q Street  Suite 2J   Omaha, Nebraska  68135